Communication

During the communication process, it may occur that the receiver does not get the intended message. In such a case, the feedback process is very important in order to ensure that the message sent was received as intended. In the event that the message was misinterpreted, it is important that the sender provides a solution as soon as the error is noticed.

Description of the Situation

A marketer sent out information to his subordinates and indicated that there will be a marketing event that would help the company in marketing its products. The information was then broken down to provide the time, date and venue of the meeting before it was sent out to all participating members through their emails.

The problem arose when the date and time were interchanged. The changes brought confusion as the members who were meant to attend the meeting did not show up when they were as expected. The venue announcer also left a small detail out of the name and ended up giving a different venue. On the date that the meeting was scheduled to take place, none of the participants turned up. However, some members were not present not because they had received the wrong message, but because they did not receive any message at all. This could have been a technological error as the many receivers were being picked out.

Analysis of the situation

The communicated text had a mix up as the times and dates were interchanged. In such development, the message did not make sense to the participants. Since the marketer was sure of sending the message, he did not bother to check or confirm the details. Such proves the significance of feedback and confirmation. As Riege (2005) noted, small errors and omissions, interrupt the communication process. The message was unclear besides the content being mixed up leading to loss of meaning.

As the end result show, the communication process was interrupted and the meeting could not take place as the participants were scattered trying to locate other members, or they did not even see the notice. Without a clear message, the entire plan was disrupted. It emerges that without timely interventions to correct errors communication issues become complicated as the marketing event shows. Consequently, the company stands to lose on a chance to sell its products and services.

The members who did not receive their mail could not even confirm if they would be attending the meeting or not. The communication process was not only misinterpreted but discontinued based on the views underscored by Trevino and Tansey (1992). The inadequate preparation due to the rush in an effort to meet the deadline led to a hurried issuance of the message.

The meaning of the message was only known to the sender who happened to be the lead marketer. The other members could not understand the message. For teamwork to occur, the sender must send the message and ensure that the message is not only received but that the intended message is also conveyed.

Solution to the Situation

In this kind of a situation, the communication process that was disrupted must be addressed to find a solution. The event still stands and the company must be represented. A remedy must be sought so as to bring a common understanding among the members. Regarding the communication obstacles observed, the following solutions would have been implemented. Reliability of the communication process is one of the attributes that must be have been ensured. It was assumed that all recipients’ emails were in the system but it seems that some email addresses were not listed. It is important that the communication media to be used is reliable and effective. Before sending any message to recipients, assessing the level of effectiveness of the communication media in question is necessary. One needs to ensure that the approach used can deliver as expected. When emailing the participants, the recipients must be cross checked in order to ensure every member is on the recipients list.

The feedback process is also very essential. A feedback process enables an individual to confirm that the message has been received in the manner that it was intended. Even with errors, they can be corrected as soon as a recipient raises a concern or question. This in turn reduces the chances of failure to meet the expected goal as every member can confirm.

Question-answer sessions are also a way of remedying communication obstacles. This is a way of ensuring that the communicated message makes sense to all participants. In case it does not, members can ask questions. Questions are a way of improving communication. If one member asks after a certain concern, the likelihood is that the rest also need the same information. In this, the reply should not only be addressed to the member who asked but to all members who received the initial message.

Language is another barrier that must have been addressed. Leaving out a name when labelling the venue of the meeting led to a misleading inference as the participants could not understand. Language must be precise and to the point since small alterations change the entire meaning of the message being passed. Rather than just send the name of the venue, it would have been better to include the location so that members can relate to the exact location.

There are several obstacles to communication when individuals try to pass a message. As they cannot be avoided, there are a number of solutions that can be use to remedy unanticipated situations. It is important to make sure that the message sent has been received as expected.

Bibliography

  • Riege A, Three-Dozen Knowledge-sharing Barriers Managers Must Consider, Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9, no. 3 pp. 18-35, 2005.
  • Trevino LK and Tansey RG, Communication Research: Flow in Computer-mediated
  • Communication Electronic Mail and Voice Mail Evaluation & Impact, Emerald Group Publishing Limite
  • Trevino LK and Tansey RG, Communication Research: Flow in Computer-mediated
  • Communication Electronic Mail and Voice Mail Evaluation & Impact, Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Trevino LK and Tansey RG, Communication Research: Flow in Computer-mediated
  • Communication Electronic Mail and Voice Mail Evaluation & Impact, Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Riege A, Three-Dozen Knowledge-sharing Barriers Managers Must Consider, Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9, no. 3 pp. 18-35, 2005.
Feb 25, 2018 in Communication